Larissa Lezhnina and Casey Herd in the Trois Gnossiennes

Larissa Lezhnina and Casey Herd in the Trois Gnossiennes. Choreography by Hans van Manen, Music: Erik Satie, Piano: Olga Khoziainova. Shot on 27.04.2014 at Dance Open 2014, St Petersburg, Russia.

Larissa Lezhnina and Casey Herd in the Trois Gnossiennes

Larissa Lezhnina and Casey Herd in the Trois Gnossiennes

Larissa Lezhnina and Casey Herd in the Trois Gnossiennes

Larissa Lezhnina and Casey Herd in the Trois Gnossiennes

Larissa Lezhnina and Casey Herd in the Trois Gnossiennes

Larissa Lezhnina and Casey Herd in the Trois Gnossiennes

Larissa Lezhnina and Casey Herd in the Trois Gnossiennes

Larissa Lezhnina and Casey Herd in the Trois Gnossiennes

Larissa Lezhnina (Russian: Лариса Лежнина) is a principal dancer with Dutch National Ballet, Amsterdam. She was born on March 17, 1969 in Leningrad (now St. Petersburg), Russia. She graduated from the Vaganova Ballet Academy in Leningrad in 1987 and joined the Kirov Ballet (now the Mariinsky Ballet). In 1990 she became a First Soloist. She left the Mariinsky in 1994 and joined the Dutch National Ballet as a principal.

Casey Herd (Salt Lake City, Utah) has been a principal with the Dutch National Ballet since 2008, after previously guesting with the company. Casey trained at the Ballet West Academy in his hometown and at the Kirov Academy in Washington D.C. Before coming to the Netherlands, he danced with American Ballet Theatre and Pacific Northwest Ballet in Seattle, where he became one of the most prominent dancers of the company.

Éric Alfred Leslie Satie (French: [eʁik sati]; 17 May 1866 – 1 July 1925) — he signed his name Erik Satie after 1884 — was a French composer and pianist. Satie was a colourful figure in the early 20th century Parisian avant-garde. His work was a precursor to later artistic movements such as minimalism, repetitive music, and the Theatre of the Absurd.

An eccentric, Satie was introduced as a “gymnopedist” in 1887, shortly before writing his most famous compositions, the Gymnopédies. Later, he also referred to himself as a “phonometrician” (meaning “someone who measures sounds”) preferring this designation to that of a “musician”, after having been called “a clumsy but subtle technician” in a book on contemporary French composers published in 1911.

The Gnossiennes are several piano compositions written by the French composer Erik Satie in the late 19th century.

Photos by Jack Devant Ballet Photography© with kind permission of the Dance Open, special thanks to Ekaterina Galanova and Adelia Mukhamedzhanova.

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